MEET THE MAKERS OF RAW POP UP / CULTURED MAGAZINE  Carolyn Batchelor - December 2018   How do your current projects reflect the increasing interconnectivity of society and the continual push for globalization?  In today’s interconnected world, one’s identity has become synonymous with one’s ideas and ideals. Selfies and images are used to define and present our chosen identities to global audiences through the use of social media and digital web. We’ve imagined Charlie as a trans-human character with no race nor gender and as a potential canvas for the future generation. Charlie’s  Electric Sheep  hopes to put self- representations in perspective by juxtaposing digital imagery and human interaction. Our aim is to remind the viewers not to lose their values in the new age as we sit on the brink of the AI revolution. We are aiming to address these contemporary issues using art as an international language without geographical or cultural barriers.   How does the modern city scape affect art and interaction and in what way does your art separate the viewer from this reality? JQ:  The static architecture that looms over us remains a constant reminder of modern civilization and pushes us to explore the many complex aspects of humanity through art. Through the use of digital tools, our installation separates the viewer from the ground they stand on and the buildings around them by being reactive to movement and interaction. It hopes to act as the fine line between the animalistic movements and behavior that we naturally engage in versus the new wave of trans-humanism that seeks to put that side of humanity aside. My art acts as a tool to define the two realities that we have been placed in as people, with digital elements that pay homage to the technology that has raised us and the use of our moving bodies as an undeniable part of our beings.   FR:  Spending most of my life in Paris and London made me realize that infrastructures constituting modern cityscapes (transport/massive habitation buildings/businesses) are also responsible for the uniformization of these areas. I am aiming to offer alternative environment possibilities through my work by changing “the normalized” aesthetic of megacities. I integrate installations and sculptures in cityscapes, or landscapes, as triggers for interpersonal communication as well as invitations to interact or perceive a space differently from its origins. I also want to display and experience more artworks outside of the gallery space, since I firmly believe that art is a cultural and educational tool that would lose its value without an audience.

MEET THE MAKERS OF RAW POP UP / CULTURED MAGAZINE

Carolyn Batchelor - December 2018

How do your current projects reflect the increasing interconnectivity of society and the continual push for globalization? In today’s interconnected world, one’s identity has become synonymous with one’s ideas and ideals. Selfies and images are used to define and present our chosen identities to global audiences through the use of social media and digital web. We’ve imagined Charlie as a trans-human character with no race nor gender and as a potential canvas for the future generation. Charlie’s Electric Sheep hopes to put self- representations in perspective by juxtaposing digital imagery and human interaction. Our aim is to remind the viewers not to lose their values in the new age as we sit on the brink of the AI revolution. We are aiming to address these contemporary issues using art as an international language without geographical or cultural barriers.

How does the modern city scape affect art and interaction and in what way does your art separate the viewer from this reality?
JQ:
The static architecture that looms over us remains a constant reminder of modern civilization and pushes us to explore the many complex aspects of humanity through art. Through the use of digital tools, our installation separates the viewer from the ground they stand on and the buildings around them by being reactive to movement and interaction. It hopes to act as the fine line between the animalistic movements and behavior that we naturally engage in versus the new wave of trans-humanism that seeks to put that side of humanity aside. My art acts as a tool to define the two realities that we have been placed in as people, with digital elements that pay homage to the technology that has raised us and the use of our moving bodies as an undeniable part of our beings.

FR: Spending most of my life in Paris and London made me realize that infrastructures constituting modern cityscapes (transport/massive habitation buildings/businesses) are also responsible for the uniformization of these areas. I am aiming to offer alternative environment possibilities through my work by changing “the normalized” aesthetic of megacities. I integrate installations and sculptures in cityscapes, or landscapes, as triggers for interpersonal communication as well as invitations to interact or perceive a space differently from its origins. I also want to display and experience more artworks outside of the gallery space, since I firmly believe that art is a cultural and educational tool that would lose its value without an audience.

Reporter Kit Bradshaw heads to the Security and Counter Terror Expo in London this week to see how the industry is innovating to keep up with the changing methods of terrorists. Swipe's Gemma Evans is at the Tate Modern to see how the Digital Maker Collective is exploring whether technology is killing creativity.

Digital Maker Collective focusing on " Women and Technology" on International Women's Day at its Tate Exchange Residency.

Filmed & Edited by: Izaak Brandt  and Nana Maiolini 

www.digitalmakercollective.org